Indoor Gardening Series: Winter

Indoor Gardening Series: Winter

Gardening is a 4 season sport, even in Chicago. While it’s negatively cold outdoors, we can grow flowers and veggies that beautify our homes, purify our air, and brighten our spirits.

Plants make us feel more relaxed and comfortable. Greenery attracts and calms us. Besides the psychological perks, there are also physiological benefits. All plants filter pollution from the air and pump out fresh oxygen. Some are superstars at removing toxins found in paints, carpets, printers, and cleaners from inside air. In wintertime when we rarely open our windows, these plants are the perfect companions for a healthy mind and body.

  Sansevieria

Sansevieria


1. Air Purifiers

All plants breath in air and CO2 then exhale cleaner air and O2. Pollutants are filtered out and fresh air is produced. Plants are the most efficient, hard-working, and adorable air filters you can buy.

  Anthurium

Anthurium

  Gasteria

Gasteria

Sansevieria - snake plant, mother-in-law’s tongue. Filters many toxins. Easy to grow indoors. Tolerates varied light levels and soil. Thrives on neglect.
Gasteria - ox-tongue. Filters benzene. Easy to grow in bright light. Thrives on neglect.
Anthurium - flamingo flower. Filters many toxins. Easy to grow indoors. Tolerates varied light levels and soil.
Aloe - aloe. Filters benzene. Sap has lots of health and healing benefits. Easy to grow in bright light. Thrives on neglect.

  Aloe in bloom

Aloe in bloom

 

The health benefits of winter gardening doesn’t stop at air purifying. Sprouts improve our nutrition intake and are tasty. There’s a quick turnover, so we can have fresh sprouts weekly.

2. Window Nutrition

8 Steps to Healthy Produce on Your Windowsill

Growing sprouts is a quick and easy way to supplement your families health and nutrition. They’re a good way to get your vitamins from whole foods rather than pills and supplements. Plus your family gets to learn a bit about botany and seed germination along the way.

1829_erin_m_36fbd50a-4c8c-4baf-a011-26c73ff9f7ae.png

Sprouts 

 As soon as day 3 and by day 5 most seeds will have sprouted and be ready to eat.

yellow-mustard-seeds-250x250.jpg

1: Use jars, cups, or other vessels at least 3” in diameter  (including lid)
2: Remove any labeling from jar. Wash thoroughly using a vinegar solution*
3: Select seed sprouts. Mustard family is easy to sprout and contains some of the most vitamin rich plants. phytochemicals with anti oxidizing compounds
4. Place seeds in a single layer in the bottom of the vessel
5. Soak for 10-20 minutes.
6. Pour off excess water. Check to insure seeds are still flat along bottom of vessel after water has been poured out. Seal jar.
7. Place in a bright location (but not direct sunlight)
8. Water and drain daily.

As soon as day 3 and by day 5 most seeds will have sprouted and be ready to eat.

Before eating rinse sprouts thoroughly. Sprouts can store in the refrigerator for several days.

After harvesting all sprouts, clean the vessel thoroughly with mild soapy water or a mild vinegar solution. Repeat.

Growing sprouts is a quick and easy way to supplement your families health and nutrition.

Bonus: To make it easier look for sprouting kits

Sprouting kit
Sprouts
Seeds (mustards, etc)